What happens at the Register Office | Venues 4 Funerals

What happens at the Register Office

When you go to the registrar you should take all these:

  • The Medical Certificate of the cause of death
  • The deceased’s medical card, if possible
  • The deceased’s birth and marriage or civil partnership certificates, if available.

You should tell the registrar:

  • The date and place of death
  • The deceased’s last (usual) address
  • The deceased’s first names and surname (and the maiden name where appropriate)
  • The deceased’s date and place of birth (town and county if born in the UK, and country if born abroad)
  • The deceased’s occupation and the name and occupation of their spouse or civil partner
  • Whether the deceased was getting a pension or allowance from public funds
  • If the deceased was married or had formed a civil partnership, the date of birth of the surviving widow, widower or surviving civil partner.

The registrar who registers the death will give you:

  • A Certificate for Burial or Cremation (known as the Green Form) unless the coroner has given you an Order for Burial (form 101) or a Certificate for Cremation (form E). These give permission for the body to be buried or for an application for cremation to be made. It should be taken to the funeral director so that the funeral can be held.
  • A Certificate of Registration of Death (form BD8). This is for social security purposes only. Read the information on the back of the certificate. If any of it applies, fill in the certificate and hand it to your Jobcentre, Jobcentre Plus or social security office.
  • Leaflets about bereavement benefits and income tax for widows/widowers/surviving civil partners, where appropriate.

If you go to a register office other than the one for the sub-district where the death took place, the above certificates will be sent to you.

 
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